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, prepare for merger. a deal takes off between u.s. airways and american. what it means for consumers. troubled waters: insights on cruise stocks following carnival's rocky week. plus, does apple have a trick up its sleeve? traders give us their takes on wristwatch rumors. first business starts now. you're watching first business: financial news, analysis, and today's investment ideas. good morning. it's friday, february 15th. i'm angela miles. in today's first look: stocks stay stuck. stocks and comodities barely budged yesterday. a cross-current of postive news on jobs and m&a deals in the u.s. offset negative economic data out of europe, which held the market in check. shares of herblife soared 15% after hours on word carl ichan bought 14 million shares of the nutrition company. and tiffany is suing costco. tiffany claims the club chain is selling engagement rings bearing the tiffany name. traders will enjoy a long holiday weekend. with presidents' day coming up on monday, the markets will be closed. mark sebastian of option pit mentoring joins us on this friday for a closer look a
exercise with the u.s. navy. the drills are being conducted off of south korea's east coast. we have more from seoul. it is an exercise that has been months in the planning. -- >> it is an exercise that has been months in the planning. a third nuclear test could lead the us and south korea to plan for a preemptive strike against the north in the future to prevent a nuclear missile launch. >> the us will have a nuclear submarine around the korean coast. the nuclear power can be deployed to korea. if the us and korea want, they will pre-empt, attack preemptively any time. >> they released footage of the president being briefed by security staff. >> north korea should pay the price for its provocation. we will recommend sanctions with practical effect. >> what was interesting was the wording, an explicit promise to carry out direct actions against north korea as part of the sanctions, a little more than a week after north korea said it would take strong, physical countermeasures against the south if it did so. it is very publicly responding to that challenge. from beijing, north korea's trad
. south korean defense officials say air force troops from the two countries are conducting a drill using f-16 fighter jets. the pilots are preparing for possible aerial combat and air raids on north korea. south korean navy commanders say they are holding ameritime mobility exercise involving 20 naval ships. army officers say they are also planning to conduct a shelling drill this week. defense officials in seoul have somehowed off a key part of their military's fire power. they released video of the newly-deployed cruise missile. the 50-second clip shows the weapons hit targets after being fired from a destroyer and a submarine. >> translator: the military is releasing the footage to ease public anxiety by showing south korea is fully equipped to deal with the north korea's nuclear missile threats. >> reporter: the general said the missiles could hit targets in north korea, even small ones. the weapons could strike the country quickly if launched by submarines near the coast. while the military stays on alert, members of the national assembly are showing political resolve. they adopted
are paying them. i can't believe we can't use the marines in these situations. someone has got to do a cost benefit analysis. can you imagine the amount of money we have spent fooling around with these contractors that weren't getting the job done? can you imagine the time we have spent on this and the money that has been spent? i would like for you, general, to talk about the cost benefit of putting marines in our embassies and why in the world this is hard for us to get our arms around and where is the analysis that shows us we are saving any money. >> just to react briefly to what would be necessarily a much longer conversation. the marines are not -- that's not their role or what they do for the nation. could it be at some point potentially? i would hate to think we would make that decision based on costs but it would require a longer conversation. >> i guess my point is god forbid we have something happen in kabul. this would look like child's play if you look at the history of what's gone on in terms of the guard force at kabul. and you know, i want to be to rt would be necessarily a
the tax code which everybody wants us to do. but also we have used a small percentage of that money to reduce the deficit. so it doesn't place too much burden on the operating structure of the country. >> so who is the one person in the white house and one person and the republican leadership who is most committed to making the tough choice because i think the one person in the white house is most authentically -- authentically committed to making is the president. i've met with him several times. i believe that he's willing to make these cuts in the entitlement programs that we have to make. that doesn't mean i don't want to continue to push them outside of his comfort zone to go a little further than you might want to go otherwise, but i think we're going to have to if we get a deal with republicans but again we'll have to push the republicans in order to do the tax reform, allows us to reduce the deficit in the same manner. >> how do you push a president? >> you know, the way i've done it is always candidly, open with him, not agree but tell them exactly what you think and why. t
a real budget cut. the u.s. postal service says it's ready to stop saturday delivery beginning this summer. it will save them $2 billion. unfortunately it's losing $16 billion a year. it's a start. more budget cuts may be coming. house speaker john boehner saying today he won't bail out the president when it comes to the sequester budget cut. and eric cantor says the spending cut sequester is going through. i will talk to mr. cantor in a little while. the u.s. and global stock market continues. japan is up 32%. first up this evening, neither snow nor rain nor saturday. the post master general today announcing the postal service will stop saturday letter deliveries. take a listen. >> a typical large organization would have either cash on hand or borrowing ability. two months worth of cash to cover operating costs. in october this year the postal service had less than four days of cash on hand. that's a scary situation. it's no situation that a business should be in. >> all right. sounds like it's time to close up shop all together and privatize the post office. four days of cash
. >> it is because television. >> hold it eleanor. >> the spectacle has lost a lot of the drama and dignity it used to have. he walks down that aisle and gets slaps and high fives. they should have had beyonce doing her number midway through it. >> every other president has walked down that aisle and i don't recall you complaining about it. >> it has lost dignity. >> ike and fdr didn't look like that. >> it is an american tradition and the fact the numbers were down is partly because people don't watch television like they used to. >> eleanor, how were obama's kneels son ratings -- neilsen ratings, the second lowest since they began taking measurement in 1993. the lowest since 2000 when bill you clinton's last drew an audience of 931.5 million. >> i think neilsen should start rating some of the social media sites and look at the exchanges between people who watched it. the american people who watched that and pick up portions that have, here our president is addressing concerns in their lives. i agree the big topics like the eu trade pac that is very important. but i don't think people in the count
for joining us and thanks for being with us. captioned by closed captioning services, inc. >> greta: , tonight, is washington a threat to americans? now, according to a new pugh poll the answer is, yes. a majority of americans saying washington poses a threat to their personal rights and freedoms. karl rove is here to talk about that plus much more ahead. "on the record" starts right now. >> the obama administration announcing big changes for the birth control coverage for employees of some religious organizations. >> we need to provide preventative services, access to preventative services for all women and that includes contraception and we also needed to respect religious beliefs. >> it would appear to be a dramatic post election reversal by the obama administration on an issue that marked a flash point in the early electoral cycle last year which by most accounts helped the campaign galvanize voters. >> january of 2009. 8.5 million americans have left the labor force. this administration is shrinking the private sector. >> when you look at that number it as pretty low number when you consi
their approach to the syrian conflict does something they could do to reassure the u.s. and the international community, it seems to be another clear implication of what you are saying is that the u.s. takes further steps to support the syrian opposition it would be read as strengthening their view that we are out to get them. >> we are out to get assaad. are we ipso facto out to get adirondacks -- to get iran? are we going to protect the allies, which is something i think we need to do despite the fact that they have a bad record? no one in syria has a sterling record, but it think we need to give them the opportunity to say there is a news syria forming. do they want to be engaged? what is the relationship there? i'm not very optimistic that we could get the iranians on board, but maybe you could find a way to make them increasingly less relevant. do they equate that with a regime change? maybe. we have to be aware of it. i think that's a stretch. i think the iranians could see, what i say is increasing value in the opportunity to talk if they begin to understand that the region is not movi
is being remembered right now. more on that later. gregg, thank you for being with us today. >> my pleasure. martha: we'll see you back here tomorrow and "happening now" starts right now. jenna: right now we have brand new stories and breaking news. >> the little boy at the center of the hostage drama, tense negotiations to get him free and the high-tech surveillance equipment now helping investigators. >>> also the troop drawdown in afghanistan. new reaction from inside that country. what the afghan people fear might happen when u.s. forces leave. >>> plus, lights out at the super bowl. did you catch this? a power outage putting the big game on hold for more than a half an hour. what was the behind the blackout? jenna: let's not jinx anything. we need our lights. jon: we do. it is all "happening now." jon: first up today, that terrifying hostage situation in alabama now in its 7th day. good morning to you. i'm jon scott. jenna: what a story. good morning everybody, i'm jenna lee. drones are now flying over that underground bunker where police say jimmy lee dykes is holding a 5-year-old boy
the u.s. patent office issued patent number 46,454. i will give you a pop quiz. it was simply labeled john deere plow. but the implement sketched out on the page could just as easily been labeled, as some historians have named it, one of the most important inventions in american history. they called it the plow that broke the plains, and it did. by replacing cast-iron with smooth steel, john deere's innovation opened up huge new swaths of land for cultivation. it made it possible for towns like aberdeen south dakota my hometown to exist. before it killing and maker took a grown man a full 24 hours. after it, it took as little as five. and every pile of soil overturned upended another assumption about what the land could produce. that, to my mind, has been the story, not just of agricultural success, but of national success. and, indeed, of global progress. this kind of game changing innovation has enabled us to leap ahead, to break the points, to increase harvest, and to frankly, feed the whole world. sometimes innovations come from the most advanced science, other times they
reaction from inside that country. what the afghan people fear might happen when u.s. forces leave. >>> plus, lights out at the super bowl. did you catch this? a power outage putting the big game on hold for more than a half an hour. what was the behind the blackout? jenna: let's not jinx anything. we need our lights. jon: we do. it is all "happening now." jon: first up today, that terrifying hostage situation in alabama now in its 7th day. good morning to you. i'm jon scott. jenna: what a story. good morning everybody, i'm jenna lee. drones are now flying over that underground bunker where police say jimmy lee dykes is holding a 5-year-old boy hostage. the boy has asperger's syndrome and is said to be as comfortable as possible. it all began when the suspect allegedly boarded a school bus, demanding hostages. police say he shot the driver when the driver tried to intervene. that driver, charles poland, was laid to rest this weekend. investigators say besides careful negotiations, dykes is showing very few signs that he is willing to end the standoff. elizabeth prann is live in mid
to say a word about the councils africa center for the benefit of the audience, those who are new to us were joining us for the first time via television or the internet. the africa center was established in september, 2009, with a mission to help transform u.s. and other healthy approaches to africa by emphasizing the building of strong geopolitical partnerships with african states and strengthening economic growth and prosperity on the continent. the center seeks to engage and inform with policymakers in the general public of the strategic importance of effort that. both globally and for american and european interest in particular. a subject which obviously -- a commitment you share by joining us today. of strategic importance. we do this for -- a robust media presence. we worked promote constructive us leadership and engagement in international affairs is done the central role of the atlantic community in meeting international challenges. the africa center supports and collaborates with product -- public and private sectors, giving practical solutions to the challenges in africa. on
of the book. it is a dirty name. we love larry. he will join us in just a minute. took it off of there. one more shot. there you go. larry shover will be here in minute. sandra: let's go to nicole petallides at new york stock exchange. we have hewlett-packard, a huge winner in the, leading the dow. >> hewlett-packard really surprised everybody, sandra. ran away with the dow jones industrials. hewlett-packard soared on a great quarter and great outlook which surprised everybody. obviously a testment to the fairly new ceo, meg whitman. david:. also a testament to david donatelli, the executive vice president came out with the new server the size of a small book. even smaller than larry shover's book. getting bad news out of europe on the weight-loss drug. this company is behind the weight-loss drug. >> this particular drug was approved here back in july 2012. second time not approved in europe. concerns about side-effects. now they will have to do more cardiovascular trials to try to get this thing restored. sandra: network automation, this is, sorry, network automation company,
will use super bowl sunday to talk about government regulations when it comes to the issue of steroids or head injuries. the phone lines are open. let's begin with a look at some of the headlines courtesy of the museum. from "the san francisco chronicle" -- from "the baltimore sun" -- let's turn to the politics and policy behind the nfl. this is a story a few days ago from "the washington post." outlining a plan and a letter to the executive director of the players union. they agreed as part of a 2011 collective bargaining agreement that the players should be tested for hgh, but the two sides of that agreed. two seasons have been played without it. last weekend in new orleans, roger goodell was asked a number of questions including one on the issue of head injuries. here is more from last week. [video clip] >> i welcome the president's comments. we want to make sure people understand what we are doing to make our game safer, not just in the nfl but throughout sports. the changes we are making a in the nfl are changing all of sports. it is a better recognition of head injuries. of treat
: a leaked document today put the spotlight back on lethal strikes by the u.s. government on u.s. citizens abroad. in response, top officials in the obama administration argued their actions are justified and legal. >> primary concern is to keep the american people safe, now do so in a way that's consistent with our laws and our values. >> ifill: attorney general eric holder today defended the justice department's rationale for authorizing the killings of americans overseas. >> we are -- we have as a basis for action that we take a congressional statute that allows us to operate against al qaeda and associated entities not only in pakistan or not only in afghanistan but in other parts of the world. we say that we only take these kinds of actions when there's an imminent threat, when capture is not feasible and when we are confident that we're doing so in a they's consistent with a federal international law. >> ifill: nbc news obtained a 16-page justice department white paper apparently prepared for congressional committees last summer that describes the obama administration's legal reasoni
explore the legal and other issues surrounding the u.s. policy. >> ifill: then, federal and state governments sue a credit ratings agency it says gave good ratings to bad rtgage investments. >> brown: ray suarez looks at president obama's use of campaign-style events to push his legislative agenda. >> ifill: hari sreenivsan examines a million-dollar match fixing scandal shaking the world of international soccer. >> brown: and playing with the enemy: we have the story of an orchestra of israelis and arabs coming together for music, and maybe more. >> the only way that we can achieve anything that is remotely related to peace is if we sit together and talk or if we at least try to. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> sailing through the heart of historic landscapes you see things differently. you get close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasures. it's a feeling that only the river can give you. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world and perhaps even yourself. viking r
. they're not used to dealing with guerrilla tactics like this and the french have said they're keen to pull out as soon as possible. whoever is left, whether it's a coalition of african forces or perhaps some un peacekeepers, they will have to adapt quickly if this is a change in tactics. >> north korean doctors have been killed in nigeria, the second attack on house workers and days after nine giving polio vaccinations were shot down. police say assailant broke into an apartment where the physicians or sleeping and be headed one of them. the other two had their throats cut. a new commander has taken charge in afghanistan. he has been given the responsibility of winding down the u.s.'s longest war. he took command from a general john allen in the afghan capital city -- in the afghan city of kabul. >> today is not about change, it's about continuity. what has not changed is the will of this coalition. what has not changed is our commitment to accomplish the mission. more and courtly, what has not changed is the inevitability of our success. >> is facing some tough challenges, among t
that. but in any event, it's the group using the one and half million cell phones but it's the group watching the south korean soap operas but it's the group that is becoming the information consumers of north korea who are desperate for more information or salivating, the chairman of google was visiting because they are thinking that the opportunities for their closed system internet. and then there's all the north koreans a sickly, the rest of north korea, most of north korea, where just puncturing the bubble of censure, of censorship that exist in north korea with what north korea really spends on defense, what it spends on its missile programs. i've always equated it to the lesson of development including the local aid budget upon the village schoolhouse door so villagers would know if the village elders were stealing the money. that was intended for the schoolhouse. i think we can through basic information in this age that more and more north koreans know about the human rights record. north korean database that's now a permanent growing database now, five, six years running bec
>> let's talk about recent comments in canada, the u.s. ambassador to canada and find that more action by canada on climate change might make it easier for the president to approve keystone. how did you interpret those comments? >> i think it was another opportunity to talk about what we are doing. i believe for the president and for canada, it is both. you can actually improve energy security and in our neighborhood of north america and with vehicle emissions standards, coal plants standards, you will eventually see that in the united states. nobody is replacing a coal plant with coal again. they are replacing it with natural gas. it reduces emissions by 50%. i did not see that as a quid pro quo. when the secretary of state and our minister of foreign affairs met and had a press conference, they talked about both climate change and energy security. we talked about vehicle emissions standards. th minister talked about the action we've taken had the the united states on coal plants in canada. i closed down some coal plants. i thought it was good for our jurisdiction but i think e
must end this uncertainty about this position. mr. president, it is time for us to end this debate. and that is what we will be voting on now. later on, there will be a vote on whether to confirm senator hagel. the vote now is whether to bring this debate to an end. i hope we will so we can get on to the nomination vote. i yield the floor. i think it's noon and time for a vote. the presiding officer: the senator's time has expired. the senator from oklahoma has 30 seconds remaining. the senator from oklahoma. mr. inhofe: let me say that we -- everything has been said, not everyone has said it. however, i would like to make sure that everyone understands that the actual statements that were made by the former senator hagel in terms of the relationship of our country with israel and iran prior to the time that he was nominated, because many of those statements were changed at that time. i encourage the no vote on cloture. the presiding officer: the time is expired. under the previous order, the clerk will report the motion to invoke cloture. the clerk: cloture motion, we the undersig
us today, everybody. i'm fresh out of time. but "around the world" is next. >>> i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael holmes. >> welcome to "around the world." egypt, a freak accident, hot air balloon explodes in the a plummets to the ground, 18 people dead. a live report. >>> vatican city, learning more about the future and what it holds for pope benedict xvi, final week cloud by scandal. >> the dow rallying from yesterday's big loss but not so for world markets. italy's election causing uncertainty. the government, europe's third largest economy, facing a deadlock. >>> egypt, tourists flying high above ancient egyptian sites plunging to their deaths when a hot air balloon explodes and crashes. >> 18 people have died. the local government has banned all other hot air balloon flights for now. it happened in luxor. the latest on the investigation. >> ian, let's start with what the theory is at the moment. there are reports of a gas cylinder exploding. describe what you've heard. >> reporter: well, michael, that's exactly what ware we're hearing. an the 1,000 feet a gas canister on the
out of it and we don't solve any problem and gave politics are just as bad for us in the next 10 years. >> quite frankly don't trust congress so if congress can't make the contracts, the first thing that will come down is who will be high-skilled or -- if the was enforcement only and they said oh yeah by the way we are definitely going to do a low-skilled thing of future and do high-skilled i wouldn't support the enforcement only because i don't trust them. i think they will stop after stop after that about this over the last couple of years when they did these peaceful approach is a lot of them failed. the immigration act that moved the countries of origin toward a green card, greenlaw stopped in the house. had stopped after it passed in the house. unfortunately there is a political strategy going on now. i personally think it only matters if it's if it's a road to an and i think that's always going the way it's going now. >> without, thank you all for coming. there will be orders for drinks in the lobbies if you want to come back. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conve
of the biggest labels in fashion. that's it for tonight's willis report. thanks for joining us. have a great night. we'll see you right back here tomorrow. ♪ lou: good evening, everybody, former senator chuck hagel's path to confirmation has just got a lot more complicated and a lot more difficult. for the first time in history, a nominee to be secretary of defense is forced to clear a 60-vote threshold in the senate to win con confirmation, and ths only the third time in history that any presidential candidate nominee to any post has been forced to win a cloture vote. >> it's the first time in the history of our country that a presidential nominee or secretary of defense has been filibusterde. what a shame. that's the way it is. i ask the concept that under rule 22, the corum be waved, and i asked the cloture vote and ask to honor the rule that the vote occurs friday. lou: hagel, until today, seemed assured of nomination having the support of the entire democratic senate caucus and two republican senators, and then he lost a critical vote this afternoon. republican senator, susan collins
china, the u.s., now canada, even leaders doesn't permit us to monitor. doesn't permit us to report to international body. doesn't permit an international body to tell us what to do with emission. sovereignty has become the obstacle to cooperation and increasely made states look more and more dysfunctional. how is that the most powerful, well equipped military nation in the world has ever seen the united states of america can't bring a handful of terrorists to heal in benghazi or mali, or afghanistan. the asymmetry between a massive military based on big ships, planes, and bombs and the reality of every day -- cross borders that a symmetry means that the war machine, the war machine of the greatest state there ever was is largelier relevant to the security threats we face. as we learn on 9/11 when in this city, a handful of hijackers living in the united states for years hijacked our planes and turned them to weapons. they didn't have to be given weapons by anyone. they seize them and use them and created devastation here. that, again, is a sign of this new asymmetry. and you find i
us at twitter.com/booktv. >> you're watching booktv. next, jeffrey engel talks about his book, "into the desert," a collection of essays by journalists, government officials, and scholars that look back on the events in the impact of the 1990-91 gulf war. it's about an hour 20 your. >> doctor jeffrey engel is the founding director of the presidential history project at southern methodist university, until the summer of 2012, he served as the class of 52 a.m., professor at texas a&m university in the bush school. so we are pleased there here as well. that you very much for the support you've given to jeffrey engel and to the bush school in texas and them. when jeff was in texas a&m county was the dreck of programming for the institute and is a graduate of cornell university. additionally, studied at saint catherine's college, oxford university, and received his ph.d in american history from university of wisconsin at madison. he served as an postdoctoral fellow in international security studies at yale university. his books include "cold war at 30,000 feet,." he received a pretty sign
political parties and civic groups because at least in theory parties are more accountable and tend to use their money to help challenges and are less inclined to support extremist, which is no small matter in today's polarized environment. here we go. thank you. here are some trends i see and how citizen as united plays into them. it did not cause them but it greases the wheels, especially since 2000 to when congress passed the bi-partisan campaign reform act. there is a redistribution of money away from can't attend -- candidates and toward groups. candidates are chiefly responsible but more is spent by others and for a while was political parties but it is non-party groups and citizens united cracked up this dynamic. -- ratches up this dynamic. there are strong incentives for collective action by partisans. national politics today is about high-stakes elections. both parties have a chance to control government and have very different views about what should be done. because of this, parses want to organize and coordinate but campaign finance laws but restraint of that. the laws were de
sponsored by the u.s. postal service, he was in essence defrauding the government because the postal service requires everybody who works for it not to use any illegal drugs, and armstrong, landis claims, was, in fact, blood doping and using hormones chshgs are both forbidden by the fewer defrance and they claim by the postal service itself. it's a civil lawsuit claiming that he cheated the government and, of course, the u.s. postal service paid millions of dollars to sponsor the tour de france teams on which lance armstrong raced and, of course, won. now, metro detroit landis has already admitted cheating, but he says in the lawsuit that's how he knew what lance armstrong was up to. now, it's not a slam dunk, andrea, because, first of all, there's a question of how long ago this happened and whether you can still sue over it now. there's also a question of whether armstrong explicitly signed a contract with the postal service which would have forbidden him to do it, or whether it was a more general contract. his lawyers also say that they tried for weeks to settle this or work a resolution
using putting more and more on the backs of individuals. we've heard story after story this morning where there is irrational use in the delivery system because of the fragmentation that we have and we have seen through the payment reform that we have done that setting the right payment incentives in place actually does help rationalize the system and start to net the fabric together between the primary care and specialty care and we actually have hospitals that start to understand what their place in the reform system is there a cost center not a revenue center and they have to actually become smaller over time for the system to become sustainable, so to me, you know, to focus our attention on the individuals in the public and beneficiaries and how we are right to change their benefits to make all of this work seems like a full of air and when the real problem is the way that we have structured the incentive on the delivery system side and fixing that we can get a long range towards addressing affordability and quality. >> we have time for a question or two from the audience. if yo
will be talking about it on tuesday. the numbers -- you can also send us an e-mail, join us at corridor.com -- twitter.com/cspanwj. great expectations, immigration is one of the issues on the president's agenda. he may get much of what he wants in part because a bipartisan support on the issue of immigration. he will look for ways to declare victory on guns and climate change. the focus on the economy, that is one headline we are getting. the front page of the washington post -- the reporting of scott wilson, the chief white house reporter for the washington post. chris van hollen is our guest on c-span's newsmakers program. he is a leading democrat in the house of representatives. >> the president will be delivering his state of the union address this week. i think he will address those questions. we are so caught up in dealing with these short-term, self- imposed crises that is undermining our ability to come up with a long-term comprehensive planned. there are philosophical differences. our republican colleagues do not believe that there is any role for the government beyond providin
was some low threshold employer match and allowing an employer to raise that match if they want to us in employment incentives so it might provide one and a half%. so you could answer it as an employment incentives. have you thought about if we move ahead in this area, what should the contribution rate be. >> that's an excellent question i encourage the committee to think not in terms of a single default contribution rate, but a differentiated alternative. and senator alexander was talking about the small restaurant chain, my guess is employees are younger and for a ban in our contribution rate might make sense. whereas a look at someone who's a bit older and this is their full-time job, the default contribution rate might be substantially higher. we know from investor psychology that individuals think in terms of raw numbers, multiple sub type, 5% of pay, 10% of pay. desired benchmarks that individuals can get their hands around and might be worth taking about something mahler. 5% for younger workers to something higher, maybe 10% for lower workers. >> were trying to make this as sim
of this committee is one that is very proud to work together. i'm happy that you are here with us to help move that tradition forward at a greater and deeper rate. we deeply appreciate it. less than two miles from where we sit today at the entrance of u.s. treasury building that is a large, bronze statue. one would assume that the figure is alexander hamilton. america's first treasury secretary. look again. this 12 foot tall statue is of albert gallatin. the longest serving u.s. treasury. in a to one, thomas jefferson asked gallatin to serve. --in 1801, thomas jefferson asked gallatin to serve here in the place of treasury secretary is more than avarice and response will -- laborous and responsible than any other. what did he do? he established fiscal discipline that was necessary a country into a great world power. gallatin also help orchestrate the louisiana purchase, doubling the size of the united states. his work is commemorated in gallatin county, montana and a beautiful gallatin national forest in the rockies as well as the gallatin river in missouri. when gallatin accepted the decision
armstrong. now the u.s. government is on his case. and one week left medical the budget ax falls. today it is transportation secretary ray la hood's turn to warn about the sec kwster's deep impact. >> this is going to happen sfwloosh clarify why -- it's the matter of mileage between -- >> because we're going to reduce the number of controllers which will reduce their ability to guide planes in and out of airports. >> republicans say that's just scare tactics. >> the president is making stuff up. he puts law enforcement -- he puts firemen and policemen who 98% of them are being paid for with your local taxes and says you're going to lose your local policeman because of this. it's not true. >> and countdown to the oscars. we'll talk to the man behind the mom natured documentary five broken cameras about the conflict in the west bank. >> good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington where we have breaking news from the justice department now, which is joining a lawsuit by a former teammate against lance armstrong. nbc justice correspondent pete williams jones me now from the newsroom. h
disturbed by it. it came during hagel hearings and was politically calibrated to get the support of the u.s. senate. what can a president say? he is not going to denounce israel now? i am very suspicious of the motives of the attack. >> israel maintained the lorries they were attacking carried game changing weapons. does that make it all right? is anyone likely to criticize israel for taking this position? >> there is a lot of criticism from the middle east, and that can be expected. we have only israel's word to go on. i have seen no independent evidence to confirm what they claimed. i am sure from their perspective these surface air missiles they said they were interdicting might be a game changer, but they are only a game changer if israel is planning an attack on has the law or lebanon or further attacks on syria. -- on hezbollah or lebanon or further attacks on syria. >> he does not want another front, does he? >> i am not sure he has enough to strike back with. certainly under international law he would be in his legitimate rights to strike back. i do not think of is going to happen.
and work with us. we care about what happens to this economy and the people who sent us here. we have proffered alternatives and solutions. we don't adhere or agree with this false choice the president's putting forward. and as cathy said, president's off campaigning in my state in newport news, virginia. yes, we're very, very concerned about the impact on the commonwealth as we are on all states. there's a way to effect the right changes and reforms so we can avoid that. and we must set aside the false choice the president is proffering. >> as the other leaders have said, the president's only -- >> all right, so that's kevin mccarthy right now. that was eric cantor before that, the speaker. doesn't look like they're putting forward a new initiative to try to break the stalemate. he's referring to legislation that members of the house, the majority, passed last -- in the last session of congress. but that legislation is not -- does not spill over into this new session of congress, if congress is going to want to take up new legislation to avert this forced spending. they have to pass
' girlfriend tell us she was shot four times through a bathroom door. local media report that police are examining a blood-stained cricket bat found at the home. >>> hugo chavez finally back home in caracus. the socialist leader flying back home in the middle of the night, guess what, announces his arrival by twitter. he feeted this, we come back to the country of venezuela. thank god. thank you, dear people. here, we continue the treatment. chavez had been recovering from cancer surgery in cuba. >>> and venezuelan officials released this picture of chavez with his daughters last week. critics have accused him of putting his country in limbo with no leader for two months now. >>> and the country music community is grieving today, police say singer mindy mccready committed suicide at her home in arkansas. she was must 37 years old. mccready rose to fame back in the '90s. mccready had been in a custody battle over her 6-year-old boy. and just last month, the father of her infant son was also found dead of a suicide. >>> the largest meteor to streak across the sky has left hundreds in t
. so, doesn't make sense are if us to stop and not be able to drive anymore. >> soon as they get it open. better off it will be. cost money to sit still and cost to run the thing empty as far as fuel surge. so. hopefully they get it cleared up. martha: looks like they're working on it. they're doing pretty good job. new mexico police say westbound traffic is open on i-40. eastbound lanes remain closed. truckers will have to sit to wait it out in that direction or try to get off on side roads. also we have this for you from egypt. an awful situation where a hot-air ballon filled with tourists exploded in the sky and then fell a thousand feet to the ground. imagine how frighten this was. these are some of the tourist photos from the launch site where the victims had taken off just moments earlier. and then at least 19 tourists from europe and asia were killed in this tragic accident, after the balloon caught fire. it triggered an explosion in a gas canister. leland vittert, live in jerusalem. what exactly happened? where is this accident? >> reporter: terrifying for the folks who w
. thank you for being with us on the "washington journal." the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., february 14, 2013. i hereby appoint the honorable chris collins to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 3, 2013, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip limited to five minutes each, but in no event shall debate continue beyond 11:50 a.m. the chair now recognizes the gentleman from oklahoma, mr. mullen, for five minutes. -- mr. mullin, for five minutes. mr. mullin: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house and to revise and extend. the speaker pro te
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